Wait and Bleed: Guro Lolita

Who says cute girls don’t love ultraviolent gore films? Well – I’m a big fan of Medical dramas were blood just randomly starts pouring out of people like fountains! – But not so much “horror” – more ER from the late 90’s and less SAW. Unless we’re talking about Dexter, tv’s most lovable sociopath serial killer ;)

One of the interesting little themes within the style is Guro Lolita – Guro means Grotesque or gross or gory – the theme can cross between gothic lolita/punk lolita to sweet/shiro.

According to the essential Lolita Handbook:

This style also goes by “grotesque lolita” or “injured lolita”. Any style of loli clothing will work for this because it’s all about what you add to it (though it is more often seen on punk or goth lolis). Eyepatches, blood stains, fake bruises, bandages, and even slings give you that “broken dolly” look. This style can either look scary and gruesome or cute and all please-fix-me. 

Popular faux injuries include

  • Eye Patches (usually the square medical gauze band aid type or gauze wrap bandage)
  • Bruised eyes/facial bruises
  • Bleeding from the mouth
  • Broken or bleeding arms
  • Occasionally injured/broken legs
  • Stab wounds – untreated or oozing under a pressure bandage

There are two aspects to Guro, the victim and the killer. The above injuries are usually seen on a guro loli that’s been violently done over where as a killer lolita is usually unharmed but splattered in blood. Blood has many strong connotations and cultural significance, think the connection blood has with coming of age and violence in Stephen Kings’ “Carrie” which in my opinion is the best of his shorter stories or the Chinese/Japanese view on nosebleeds and sexual desire. The Victim in guro is often bruised, sore and helpless but alluring where as the blood splattered Guro is mad, sometimes armed, dangerous and empowered. The Killer Guro look is often done in Shiro (Shiro = Japanese for White. Shiro Lolita is a lolita dressed in all white) outfits to highlight the brightness of the blood, reminds me of The Blood Splattered Bride scenes from the Kill Bill series which is a reference to an earlier film about revenge.

Guro as a fashion is a twisted little look at what horrifies and allures us, though most Lolitas reserve the blood and bandages for events such as Halloween or horror-movie festivals it’s strange how it has seeped into the cloth of this sweet style.

Advertisements

3 Responses to “Wait and Bleed: Guro Lolita”

  1. I love this article!

    Guro-lolita is never given much thought except at mostly Halloween or with movies and stuff (X-Cross, for example). I haven’t really thought of how Sweet lolita or the shiro- theme is used more often, and then with darker gothic lolita you don’t see it as much, but I see why.

  2. Very interesting. I’m glad I found a more thorough description.

    Is it bad that I’m turned on by the whole guro lolita idea?

  3. NightHawk Says:

    I would rock this style! I like the Guro Lolita Style.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: